The Kikayon Hagaddah

At Passover time, it's easy for us to get so wrapped up in preparing for the holiday, we lose focus on the most important part of the Seder:  teaching the kids the story of the Exodus.

The Kikayon Haggadah provides Jewish teens not only with a fun, age-appropriate and engaging Passover text but with the means they require to lead their own Passover Seder.  Jewish teens find themselves as the crossroads of identity and obligation.  They absorb these messages in preparation for their b’nai mitzvah but too often leave their sense of self behind.  With this teen-led Hagaddah, not only will Jewish teens a poignant and personal way to celebrate and examine the holiday, they’ll begin to realize their potential as mentors for younger teens and future leaders and builders of the Jewish community. 

The core of the Hagaddah is the “Maggid” section, where the Passover story is told.  Similar to our “Torah Time Live!” Torah plays and the skits in our successful “Chanukah Seder” program’s text, The Kikayon Hagaddah includes comedic drama plays, traditional songs, and original parody songs focusing on various points in the story.  In fact, we offer more than one version of the Hagaddah, depending on whether your teens prefer older standard and classic Broadway tunes or more recent popular songs.

Included with the Hagaddah is a Leader’s guide, to be used by the teen together with an adult to help them prepare for the Seder itself.  The guide is geared toward adults while enhancing leadership training for teen facilitators.  It can aid in helping encourage students on how to use the hagaddah, enhance the seder, make the experience more meaningful, and overall how to engage these age groups in having fun while taking the material seriously.  Ideas for everything from food preparation to creative and interactive tableside games will be included in the handy, color-coded guide. 

 

Great for family gatherings, youth group events, or even synagogue-wide Sedarim, the Kikayon Hagaddah provides the tools teens need to lead the Seder, making the holiday their own.